Recognizing the 100th Anniversary of the NAACP Silent March

Recognizing the 100th Anniversary of the NAACP Silent March


Please join the African American Cultural Center in recognizing the 100th anniversary of the NAACP Silent Protest Parade.
 
Tickets | FREE | More info
 
The parade took place on July 28, 1917, and was a silent march of about 10,000 African Americans along Fifth Avenue in New York City, starting at 57th street. The event was organized by the NAACP, church and community leaders to protest violence directed toward African Americans and the then recent lynchings of African Americans in Waco and Memphis. The parade was precipitated by the East St. Louis riots in May and July 1917 where at least 40 black people were killed by white mobs.
 
Local artist, Alex Stokes, will be exhibiting work which reflects the time period as part of the November 1st Friday festivities:
 
Alex Stokes is an Albany based journalist and artist who loves his city. "My art is a way of giving back to the community featuring illustrations of icons and freedom fighter's past and present. My hope is that my art inspires others to pursue their creative identity and learn the identities of those who have served as an inspiration to me." 
November 3 | 6:00 - 8:30 PM